Tumblewords

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Tuesday, June 01, 2010

T for ABC Wednesday

ABC WEDNESDAY ROUND 6: T is for...



Oftentimes I thrive on doing things that cause anxiety in others.


Dandelions and I gave up our fight (I didn't win) and I learned to love thistles.

They each have such unusual beauty. And they require absolutely nothing. They grow without fertilizer, without water, without conversation. They just are.

It was several years before I actually connected floating thistledown with the actual thistle. Very like dandelion parachutes. How typical of me to avoid details.

Dandelions have many uses, including wine, but I'm not sure how valuable the thistle is. Do you know?


Digital photo.
♥     ♥     ♥

30 comments:

Sylvia K said...

Lovely plant and beautiful color -- one of my favorite! Enjoy the rest of your week, hope you had a great Memorial Weekend!

Sylvia

Paul C said...

As a farm boy the thistle was not welcomed in a grain field. They tended to take over and were invasive. However, they do have a beautiful bloom as you show so well. There is a globe thistle that we had in our perennial bed which was a welcome addition. I also am tolerating more dandelions. The price of a perfect lawn is too high.

dragonfly said...

I love the composition of your photo this week, I have many friends who are Scottish and thus the thistle reminds me of them.

Reader Wil said...

I happen to like thistles too. I like this colour purple.

Gordon Mason said...

As a proud Scot, there is nothing more valuable than the thistle!!

anthonynorth said...

Yes, the thistle is very important to the Scot. As for dandylions, mine are getting as big as Triffids.

Granny Smith said...

Actually an artichoke is an immature thistle of a certain type. (note the "choke") If you could see them growing down near watsonville CA, you would recognize them as thistles.

Love your post!

Roger Owen Green said...

Very zen of you, surrendering like that. I would too, but the neighbors would complain. (Sigh.)

On behalf of the ABC Wednesday team, thank you! - ROG

Beverley Baird said...

Was it not the thistle or burr that inspired velcro?
I have a beautiful tablecoth embroidered with thistles - from Scotland. I love it!
Great post!

VJF said...

Isn't it funny how some plants that we don't want in our yards have such interesting flowers. Great shot!

Amy said...

Sue, I love the beveled edges on the photo and the color is wonderful. The only thing I remember about thistles is that they do not agree with dairy cows' digestive system.

♣☆♥Willa♥☆♣ said...

It's beautiful! I love its color.

Stan Ski said...

I know how important they are to Scots, but learning to love them is not a course I would study.

jingleyanqiu said...

lovely plant with T word..
my first time attending.
Hope that you take a look at it.

Hildred and Charles said...

I think thistles are quite splendid, and their connection to Scotland only adds to my fondness for them.

Paula Scott said...

Some varieties of thistles have medicinal uses. Milk thistle is given commonly as a liver aid. But, it is also used in some cosmetics (they don't reveal that to you though).
I do love the flowers and dead seed heads of this plant! And, you are so right-they require no effort on my part to grow!

Jay said...

Thistles are not only a very successful plant with a beautiful flower, but they are very important to insects, and also to some birds. We hang a 'thistle feeder' out for goldfinches!

Jayne said...

Thistles are not a problem around here so I can just admire them but dandelions? Oh I gave up long ago - there *is* no winning that battle!

Carina said...

It doesn't have to be useful. It's inspirational!

Joy said...

Both plants are great survivors, they will always return. I admire your live and let live attitude. Thistles are very pretty, even if some of them are a bit scratchy despite the word thistledown having a cosy feel to it.

Carol said...

My husband has an ongoing battle with dandelions. If it were up to me, I'd just learn to live with them and maybe mow a little more often. As to the thistle, although I know I can't ignore them, I do like the flower. And besides the seed that the American Goldfinch (as well as many other birds) love, the goldfinch uses the thistle head puffball when it goes to seed for its nest.

Jama said...

They look so pretty!

peripheralperceptions said...

Thistles are only good to admire from a distance. The flowers are pretty, but the thorns at the base are treacherous. Guess that's how they keep from being pulled up!

jabblog said...

If they choose to grow in our garden we let them. Thistle seeds are very important for birds like godlfinches. Nothing (natural) in this world is wasted :-)

arabesque said...

don;t have any idea also. sorry, :(
but i like this post and the flower looks so pink! ^0^
very beautiful.

Autumn Belle @ KDP said...

It looks like this beautiful flower is embedded inside the crystal.

Hood Photo Blog said...

Great choice for "T"! Very pretty picture :)

Hood Photo Blog

Ann said...

as with most weeds, I wonder if there is herbal properties with Thistles. I did cook dandelion leaves when I was in Canada when there wasno Chinese greens.

Jingle said...

http://jingleyanqiu.wordpress.com/2010/06/05/poetry-awards-4-week-21-participants-and-fresh-poets/

two awards on the bottom,
many thanks!

Anna said...

It is a good time of year to write about and take photos of plants. When it comes to plants that begin with the letter "T" I almost wrote about thistles. I chose another t-plant instead.
I like your comparison of the dandelion and the thistle, both having flying-seeds. My daughter loves dandelions, and has just discovered their white-ball-stage and likes to blow them apart and see how they fly away, hover and float in the air.

Best wishes,
Anna

Anna's Ts